We’re proud of the personal relationships the providers here at SERO develop with each patient they treat. We know that getting to know patients and their families allows us to deliver premium care and is the key to creating an environment of trust and comfort.

We also believe that allowing our patients to get to know us is just as important. Each month, we interview one of our doctors to learn more about them on a personal level and share their stories.

This month, we are pleased to introduce Dr. Jahan Mohiuddin.

Where did you attend college?

After earning a Bachelor of Science in Public Health (with a minor in Chemistry) from the University of North Carolina, I began my medical training at the UNC School of Medicine. I then moved to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania for my residency, where I served as Chief Resident in Radiation Oncology.

Tell us about your family.

I’m lucky enough to have married my college sweetheart. We have a two-year-old son and a little girl on the way. Lots of diapers and not a lot of sleep in our future! After five years in Philadelphia, we recently moved back to North Carolina to be closer to our parents.

What do you and your family enjoy doing when you are away from work?

Our two-year-old loves trucks, so we’ve been spending time at construction sites lately! We also love vacations that involve either the beach or hiking. When not on diaper duty, I enjoy golf, table tennis, and landscape photography.

What inspired you to choose your specialty?

My journey to radiation oncology began when my grandmother was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. As an undergraduate at UNC Chapel Hill, this personal experience inspired me to work in a cell biology lab studying pancreatic cancer.

During medical school, I discovered my passion for taking care of patients with cancer. When it came time to pick a specialty, radiation oncology’s mix of strong patient relationships, technological innovation, and emphasis on evidence-based practice was a perfect fit for me. I’m grateful for the opportunity to serve my patients and their families as their radiation oncologists.

What was your first job?

While a freshman in high school, I worked as a counselor at my local municipal golf course’s junior golf camp. I’ve always enjoyed teaching—and my parents also loved that this job allowed me to play the course for free!

What interests you most about oncology?

My patients often ask me, “What can I change about my lifestyle?” While there are no easy answers, the research I’m most proud of is investigating the relationship between our natural intestinal bacteria (“microbiome”) and cancer treatment outcomes.

A healthy microbiome, which is determined in large part by a balanced diet of mostly plants, is consistently linked to better cancer treatment outcomes. I’m privileged that my research helps empower patients with evidence-based strategies to positively influence their health.